“Aren’t all these who are speaking Galileans? Then how is it that each of us hears them in our native language?” (Acts 2:5-12)

NOTE:  It is not be facetious but only Biblical factual to ask you have you ever listened to the Swaggart’s speaking in unknown tongues, and heard it come out in your own native language.  Yes, NEVER!  Now, that is real evidence!

Four big and glaring exegetical problems with turning Acts 10 about Peter and Cornelius into the Swaggart’s oft repeated statement, “Be baptized in the Holy Ghost with the evidence of speaking in unknown tongues.” (1). On the first day of Pentecost after the Ascension, the people on whom the Spirit fell spoke in known languages (tongues) so they could be understood, not mumbling in unknown tongues, and anytime afterwards like Acts 10 they spoke in a known language. How in the world can any faithful exegesis of Acts 2:5-12 on the image mean anything except that the listeners were amazed and perplexed that they heard in their own languages–“—we hear them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues!” Any persons, Swaggarts or not, must want to believe in unknown tongues contrary to the Bible evidence. (2). It strains the text to make the Holy Spirit falling on them to be the equivalent of a baptism, and you will notice that when the scripture wants to say baptism it uses the word, like they were baptized in water. (3) Again to use the word Ghost for Holy Spirit is disrespectful of the third member of the Trinity, God the Holy Spirit Greek word is pneuma for spirit not ghost. (4). Speaking in public in churches with unknown tongues is precisely forbidden in I Corthians 14. Any such behavior is to be done only in private devotions, as it sends the wrong message of weirdness to thos that are listening.

“Now there were staying in Jerusalem God-fearing Jews from every nation under heaven. When they heard this sound, a crowd came together in bewilderment, because each one heard their own language being spoken. Utterly amazed, they asked: “Aren’t all these who are speaking Galileans? Then how is it that each of us hears them in our native language? Parthians, Medes and Elamites; residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome (both Jews and converts to Judaism); Cretans and Arabs—we hear them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues!” Amazed and perplexed, they asked one another, “What does this mean?” (Acts 2:5-12)

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